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? Is Your Headline Supported on These Four Pillars?

  1. Does it arouse relevant curiosity?
  2. Does it make a simple, easily understood, ultra-compelling promise?
  3. Does it trigger the dominant motivating emotion you’ve identified in your research?
  4. Does it imply proof of promise?

Your headline is not the ad for your product.

Give people a reason to read other than to find out whether they may want to buy your product.

Promise them great things if they’ll just consume your web page.

  1. Compile 25 headlines.
  2. Pick 6 that I will work and test them.
  3. Use the other 5 as subheads throughout the page to propel readership, and draw skimmers and skippers back into the copy.

? Does Your Headline Have the Look?

  • Where you break lines is also important.
  • You want maximum impact and momentum when your prospect reads it.
  • Anything that can enhance immediate comprehension will help your conversion.

? Is Your Opening Provocative?

Start by rehashing the conversation your prospect has been having with his or herself about the area of concern you want to help him with.

Curiosity, emotion, and relevant promise rule the day.

Man, gold tornado

Use grabbing images and text!

 

 

? Are You FAB Balanced?

Does your web page paint a picture of your prospect’s future life as a result of his /her purchase and the emotional pay off it represents?

Does it pledge the realization of positive feelings, and/or the relief of negative ones?

Show how those outcomes are achieved with concise descriptions of the features and advantages that will deliver them.

Strike a balance between

? Features (what it is).

? Advantages (how it’s better than other alternatives).

? Benefits (what your product does for your prospect, both physically and emotionally).

 

? Are You Triggering the Buying Emotion?

Demonstrate your personal belief in what you are selling (Confident Excitement).

While you may want to put your reader in pain momentarily, the bulk of your page should be upbeat, positive, and full of inspired energy.

 

? Is Your Body Copy Highly Readable?

  1. Simple.
  2. Short Sentences
  3. Plain 10 to 12-point font
  4. Paragraphs 110 words max
  5. Use words that are comfortable, familiar, specific to the targeted audience
  6. Inject subheads
  7. Highlight important points

 

? Do You Have High “YOU” Density?

Use YOU, YOUR, and extensions thereof to the hilt.

They translate them to ME and MINE.

Tell stories in the first or third person.

The key is always to keep the reader squarely in the action.

 

? Are you speaking intimately?

Feel a strong sense of personality when reviewing your web page.

Visualize yourself writing a personal letter to a friend, someone you care about deeply.

Build relationships one at a time.

 

? Are you inspiring the reader’s imagination?

?Emotion gets desire.

?Desire allows suggestibility.

?Suggestibility compels direct action.

Bonus: Spark your reader’s creative imagination by associating the promise of what you’re selling to things he’s already familiar with.

 

? Do you offer proof?

1. Specific testimonials, success stories, case studies and other examples of social proof are essential.

2. Describing the mechanism that makes your product work — proof of process — is equally important.

3. An outrageous, ballsy guarantee is another form of proof.  Use visual proofs wherever possible.

4. Show physical products in action.

5. Show before and after pictures for intangibles.

? Is your offer irresistible?

Write to cover the needs of the greedy and/or procrastinators.

✴️ FOMO: Are you piling on reasons to act now — additional bonuses, discounts, etc. — that may not be available if your prospects return to your web page later?

✴️ COMPARE: Are you using the power of comparison — showing how your product delivers the same results as alternatives costing much more … while comparing its price to trivial items?

 

? Do you close like this?

Big Tip: When you close, use future tense language that assumes the sale. “When it arrives, here’s all you do …”

As soon as the basic story is out (usually about halfway down the page) I start asking for the order, again and again and again.

? And finally, do you use this P.S. trick?

The P.S. line gets read a lot.

  •  Give them the CTA again.
  •  Associate positive outcomes with taking the desired action, and negative ones with delay or inaction.
  •  Restate your guarantee and
  •  Ask for the sale one last time.

 

-Tommy A.

COO Bottom Line Strategy

Small Business Strategist

[email protected]

Visit our website: http://www.bottomlinestrategy.com/blog

 

PS: When choosing social media images:

1. Optimize them for mobile versus desktop.

2. Avoid clutter.

3. Add branding.

Get Your Free Guide Now! For the latest on images in social media, download my FREE guide, “Optimal Sizes in Pixels.”